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with the u.s. think you, i yield back. >> mr. affleck, i think you have raised a central issue, the lack of security among the population. right now we are relying upon congolese government to provide as security. in afghanistan, we've got a questionable partner in the karzai government. that has been difficult. we have a less than credible partner in the congolese government. in afghanistan, we have gone through these stabilization operations as an alternative way to provide security at the local level with the villages, communities, whereby we have been providing some arms and training to the local population there so that they can provide their own security. obviously, the karzai government has been opposed to that. are there any opportunities for any alternative strategies, given the nature of the in theese government any d drc, mr. affleck? >> i will yield to an expert fellow panelist year, but one of the -- the basic issue, and one that will go a long way and that i alluded to earlier, climbing some influence to president -- are applying some influence to president kabila so that p
view threaten u.s. interests in africa and require the attention of the government and the world. that's why we convened the hearing to assess and a path forward and stabilize the situation and to address ongoing humanitarian needs. i would like to welcome my friend and partner on the subcommittee senator ikesson and i understand we may well be joined by others and to thank our distinguished witnesses for sharing their insight and expertise. earlier this year, a security and political vacuum was exploited by extremists. today al qaeda and aqim and two affiliated groups control the majority of northern malli an area roughly the size of the state of texas making it the largest territory controlled by islamist extremists in the world. i am concerned the current approach is not comprehensive and forward leaning enough to address all threeze crises, security and plit and humanitarian. today we'll examine the policies. we'll assess evolving plans for a regionly led multilateral intervention and consider the complimentry goals of encouraging elections and restoring security by reclaiming the
think it was on friday -- in which unnamed u.s. officials were suggesting that morsi might have learned from the last couple of weeks that winner take all is not the way to go and that he needs to reach out to his political opponents. do you think that the brotherhood understands this referendum as in part a referendum on the way it's running politics in egypt? >> to some extent yes, but i think there's a bigger problem here. the brotherhood is in full existential mode. they're extremely paranoid. they believe that opposition is out to destroy them. they think liberals are anti- democratic and are out to bring down who they view to be elected and legitimately elected president. so they're very much in that mode of thinking. and that's why essentially one of their justifications for the authoritarian november 22 decree is -- and brotherhood leaders actually told me this -- is yes, we know it looks bad, we know it's kind of anti- democratic, but the normal rules of politics are suspended until future notice because we are in this fundamental turning point, and this is what we have to do.
examples in the u.s. may be, i think we all it to the chinese reformers -- owe to the chinese reformers to familiarize them with other possibilities. prior to the financial crisis of 2008 and still to some degree today, many chinese reformers have focused chiefly on the u.s. to the exclusion of other models, drawn by our power as much as our ideals and ideas. i think it is more in power when to our chinese friends -- empowering to our chinese friends to lay out a broader array of possibilities. our chinese friends can see a range of possibilities and see what our universal ideals in promoting human dignity in a range of human institutional designed to get us there so they can craft something that is true to those ideals, but reflective of chinese society. just by way of example, six years ago, our harvard law school project worked with two chinese partner institutions and did the first conference ever in china's history on disability rights. we drew experts from an array of different countries, many of them individuals with disabilities. each of them discussed the models of his or her c
in the region, the regional leaders, people inside syria who are calling for more u.s. involvement and activity. there's an expectation that after the election the obama administration would take the wondering- we're all and waiting to see what is going to be. >> thanks to both of you for your questions. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> if you work for them, you get a mercurial, sometimes j generous, almost cruel boss. he did not know how to apologize. men of his age and class are not going to apologize to a young secretary our typist. he had a way of turning the tables. his version of apology would be to say, i am a kind man and you're doing a good job today. the issue is never settled. he always had to get the last word in. one night going through white hall, a german bomb fell nearby. his bodyguard pushed him into a doorway. a couple of thompson's men were slightly wounded. churchill did not like to be touched. he said, thompson, do not do that. tonight, and extended 90 minute q&a with paul reid. "the last lio
reports that there are 264,000 -- rifles manufactured each year in the u.s. and of those a 5,443 are exported overseas and 248,000 are used right here in the u.s. a bitter irony that we are confronted with at sandy hook is that the firearm industry's association their headquarters are located just across the highway from the sandy hook elementary school and while focusing on large capacity weapons is important, i also have a bill, hr 66 a. legislation aimed at establishing a nationwide system for prohibiting unlicensed gun ownership and granting the u.s. attorney general broader authority on the program. as sad as the sandy hook incident is for all of us, we must be cognizant of the fact that gun violence has been terrorizing neighborhoods in chicago, detroit, houston, washington washington, d.c. for over decades now. one of my local newspapers, the "chicago tribune," reports that at the end of march, murders in my city had spiked almost 60%. and as of june, homicides in chicago were up almost 20% over last year. 488 murders to date. ranging from 18 months to 19 years. these
according to what is institutionally appropriate. the u.s., there will be a friend of syrian meeting. reports are is that the u.s. is preparing to recognize transitional governments if one were out of this new revolutionary coalition. if there is a transitional government that is recognized, what will the relationship be to these councils that are more ad hoc? are these local? council local do they have to be -- are these local council sustainable? do they have to be accountable for the structures that may emerge? what is the sustainability in the future of these councils? >> they can build their relations. people have to survive. during my stay both in aleppo and italy you see every day, especially if you could to center aleppo, it is bombing. it is a warm toward situation -- war torn situation. different italians were able to unite. one of the first issues was to get them out of the city. it is much more likely that you get bombed. based on they got bombed. -- later on they got bombs. the first challenge is that the city has to be able to defend themselves. how are they going to be
're talking in a room the u.s. but a lot of time in. you came to the senate -- that uyoyou have spent a lot of time in. you can to the senate. what do you see as the legacy of time did you spend in this room? >> back in the clinton years, we were able to actually balance the budget, we treated the longest period of uninterrupted growth. -- created the longest period of uninterrupted growth. and we were paying down the debt. in recent times, i've been part of a nonpartisan commission to resolve these debt issues. there we had 11 of the 18 members agree on a plan to the country back on track. i still believe that is probably the best blueprint for going forward. i was also part of the group of six that became the group of eight, evenly divided the dream republicans and democrats. -- that between republicans and democrats. >> lots to go back with. let me start with the 1990's. how much of that success was the bursting economy with the tech bubble that was happening that brought more money into the coffers? >> all of these things are connected. that is my belief. governmental policy, what happe
they can be kept at one of six u.s. detention facilities on the mainland. -- at guantanamo bay and whether they can be kept at one of the six u.s. detention facilities on the mainland. this is in it. we will see you again tomorrow morning. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> coming up today, and look back at the 1990 budget deal followed by the president of the european parliament on the eu and u.s. partnership. later, jon huntsman talks about the role of la in china. -- rule of law in china. >> washington worked his way up. at the urging of one of his brothers he immigrated out west where the lead mine industry was in may paid a. he arrived in a ship, by stagecoach. he arrived on steamboat in this muddy town. he established a lot have been in slowly worked his way up. he became a very successful lawyer and then became involved politically. he ran for congress, search for eight terms. in any profession did abraham lincoln -- served for eight terms. as they arised, they were a close colleague during the civil wa
at 11:15 eastern. "booktv." >> according to a report, the u.s. now has more student loan debt and credit card debt. next, a discussion on how to ease the debt burden on students and their families. hosted by propublica and the lower east side tenement of new york city. [applause] >> with a degree comes student debt. i'm really happy to be here tonight. it is great to take some time, to have this many and this whole set up to discuss these things, and these issues. i think propublica does a fantastic job with this, as they do with everything. we are happy to have a fantastic panel with the array of experts you would want to be discussing this issue. marion has been covering this for propublica, and a month ago had a fantastic piece that would-be the result of months of investigation of the debt burden on parents. that is an aspect that not a lot of people have been talking about. although you may have read about it on the cover of the "new york times" today, a month ago is when she began talking about it. we have the publisher and author of a best seller called "secrets to winning a schol
is for the first time really being called out as a problem. >> dysfunction in the u.s. health-care industry. dr. marty makary on what hospitals will not tell you, tonight it 10:00 -- at 10:00. >> the supreme court will look at what happened in 2008, and they will say that this precedent. and indiana had -- >> when we talk about the facts, they decided on the indiana case it was constitutional for them to establish i.d. states who have subsequently -- >> correct, they talked about indiana -- let me finish because you misrepresented what i said. the supreme court is the law of the land. >> when i hear these accusations that black people -- voter i.d. laws disproportionately affect minorities -- it seems to me somehow we have something missing in our brain. to me, if white americans can go throughto voting all the processes to follow the laws, what are you telling black people? that somehow they are not good enough? that is what bothers me about a lot of the rhetoric coming from democrats and the left, that we always have to make special -- you know, there has to be a specialness when we deal with
the comptroller general of the united states. he was also the head director of the -- of the u.s. government accountability office for almost 10 years. he is widely read and authored numerous articles on the debt deficit and he has a new initiative which i think makes tremendous sense and may doom it obscurity where things sometimes don't get discussed but david's new group is looking at the efficiencies, the inefficiency, the duplications in the government to try and find areas where we can save money without cutting. and i think it's a very interesting initiative and it's one that you all should look into and see about supporting and i hope that he will mention it at least briefly in some of his comments today. so with that introduction, i'm going to turn to the panel and i'm going to sit down and we're going to start discussion hopefully some of these issues. >> and i'll start with david on the right side and we'll just move right across. >> thanks for coming. first, there are challenges between the federal state and local levels. some of the commentators are inadequate budget control, es
its limits, only the private and public working together can get the u.s. economy fully back on track. in particular it will be critical that fiscal policymakers come together soon to achieve longer term fiscal sustainability without adopting policies that could derail the ongoing policy. thank you. i would be happy to answer your questions. >> i guess i have ad. unemproacr -- you have another paragraph that's not just targeted something else. so what good are these targets if you have to reference the calendar date? >> we will be learning about what unintended consequences they make, and we will see what else happens to the economy that affects the levels of unemployment, for example, that we hope to achieve. so for that reason, as i discussed in my opening remarks, we decided to make the right ra for asset -- criteria for asset purchases qualitative right now because we have a number of issues we need to look at before we go forward. rates were well understood and we understand the relationships between those and rate increases and the state of the economy. so we have been able to g
questions from the audience. hosted by the u.s. chamber of commerce this is just under an hour. >> thank you very much. thank you, everyone, for being here this morning. especially those who traveled to be with us. it's nice to close the doors from the rest of washington and the fiscal cliff debate for a little while and talk about fiscal challenges elsewhere. whether it's a good news or bad news, at least it gives us an opportunity to talk about something a little bit different than the news of the day in this final two weeks, i think, before hopefully congress finds an opportunity to either avoid or move or solve some of the fiscal cliff issues and fiscal challenges that we face. and thank you for dick gravich and the work of the panel and the commission he co--led. there are copies of that report that were available when you came in. it's an excellent document that i really encourage everyone to take a close read. it's filled with good analytics in terms of what's going on on the state level. to help us understand. and i fully agree, dick, with your comments earlier about the disconnect.
of pennsylvania. his research includes the u.s. economy, tax policy, and the stock market. he is previously a senior economist at the board of governors at the federal reserve system. he went to that graduate school of business at columbia university. he has worked for both the george w. bush and clinton administrations. both of you went to the same university. i'm sure you can agree on everything today. dr. zandi first. >> thank you for the opportunity. it is an honor to be here with kevin, a good friend of mine. let me say that these are my own personal views. lawmakers have to resolve three issues -- first, the fiscal cliff. second, raising the treasury debt ceiling, which as you know is becoming an issue rarely soon. third, achieving long-term fiscal sustainability. that is deficit reduction and tax increases and spending cuts that allow the gdp ratio to stabilize by the end of the decade. these three things need to be done now. in terms of the fiscal cliff, if policy is unchanged and we go over the cliff and there is still no change after that, the gdp in 2013 will 3.5 percentage point
adhered to the u.s. constitution. rep. ron paul was giving his retirement speech and to his credit, to his credit -- to me makes a lot of sense. i believe him when he says our liberties are being weakened. i am so sorry that they tried to discredit him. he makes a lot of sense. he bases his thinking on the founding fathers and their intentions. i am not very clear of the fiscal cliff. i understand that we are in trouble. the middle east situation that is going on is a can of worms. with our economic downturn, i am not so sure about that yet. even things like that mortgages, which is true. >> are you working? caller: i am unemployed, but i do? taxes. i stopped getting it in march of last year because of my health issues. >> unemployment is going to end, that is one of the expiring provisions. new castle, pa.. democratic line, jeanne. >> my main comments, i think that the problems, one of the main problems is the grover norquist pledge that the officials, mainly republicans, have taken. it should be deemed unconstitutional. no elected official should be allowed to take any kind of pledge. wh
from a week in brazil. the u.s. would have just grown faster than brazil in the most recent quarter, 2.4%. i raise this because you go down there and talk to business people about why it is. we could have made little more taxes here and a little more regulation there and cost of labor there and a fair amount of uncertainty about what we'll do in the future. they have taken the steam out of it. this is a fragile and requires government to facilitate rather than layer cost and uncertainty on top of it. with that uncertainty and a very aggressive regulatory agenda which has caused uncertainty around health care costs. you add that up and you have a period in which american business is operating under a huge weight. government rates the conditions where businesses and scientists can have the freedom to get the work done. that is an important thing to think about. government can create the conditions under which the cost is listed to allow businesses to innovate. >> if i could follow up. i thought this was amazing. u.s. firms spend 36% to comply with regulation than larger firms. the small
. a cherished leader for the entire house. joe baca is a lifelong public servant, a paratrooper in the u.s. army, look at this, the 101st airborne and the 82nd airborne divisions. he served california state legislature. he made his mark standing firm against harmful and an ty immigrant measures and leading -- anti-immigrant measures and leading on food stamps. it's fraught with meaning. a lot of work and leadership he put into it in the farm bill. joe baca came from humble beginnings, yet his accomplishments are truly significant. the list goes on and on of our colleagues that congresswoman eshoo mentioned. all of these members, public service has been a calling, a cause and a core facet of their character. california has been proud to have them as our representatives in congress. for those of us who served with them, it's an honor for each of us to call you colleagues. for some of us, a very, very special honor to be considered your friend. we all wish you -- we each wish of you much success in the years ahead. we look forward to coming -- continuing our work together on behalf of our great gol
. this will create thousands of u.s. jobs in the hardest-hit industries on jobs that cannot be of course using materials that are 90% made in the usa energy efficiency is unique in that it creates its own cash flow. it pays for itself. there are significant barriers that prevent this from being harvested more efficiency -- more efficiently. one is to begin -- and this is akin to building power plants. we know how to finance power plants. they supply predictable amounts of energy and utility can easily raise capital. however we lack the same capital for energy efficiency even notice understood to be the most cost-effective resource for meeting our needs. the energy efficiency efforts equate to a resource greater than any other source in the country. greater than nuclear, natural gas or coal. this is a great example policy that can move the -- this provides incentive to home owners to increase -- the greater the incentive, i the savings. transitioning allows for business model metrology and creates a system to reward innovation. the good news this the systems will need to make this economically
totingham, sir we look up in disgunfight and disbelief at discrimination. the u.s. after the civil war, racism. britain in the 180000s, sexism. it wasn't until someone had the initiative to stand up and say, this is wrong, that discrimination was overcome the black civil rights movement for my first example and the suffrage yet mement as my second. but we're still discriminating. at the time, the phrase, equality for all -- it's ridiculous with the age discrimination regarding minimum wage inrder to increase the quality in our democracy the manipulate wage needs to be standard figure for all. the thought that young people areelow their infear you're colleagues and less deserving of a higher wage is outdated, ewan equal. we need to fight for civil liberties for all young people, and with that comes minimum wage for all and for that reason it should be our national campaign. [applause] >> thank you. i'm sorry. we have to wind up the debate becaus we have reached our allotted time. i just want before i call -- to welcome the honorable gentlemen, colonel stewart, who entered the chamber at
the northeast has been limited support and even violates the u.s. constitution. the chairman privatizing language is no private sector proposal for the northeast corner and the real competition act was determined by the nonpartisan congressional resource -- research was determined to violate raising costs. and eliminating long distance service. we agree we need true high speed rail is in the northeast corridor but we need to have a serious conversation about how this is to happen and they focus solely on privatizing with the goal of making the administration look bad. needs to stop. i want to welcome today's families and thank them for joining us. i look forward to their testimony. i yield back the balance of my time. >> thank you. how they do for your comments. i agree with the first part of her statement rather than the latter part. [laughter] you can tell we have a good report. seeking recognition? >> thank you. thank you for all the hard work. we may not agree on a lot of things. only a transportation is important to you. it is great. as someone who rides the rails just about every w
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